The items you’ll need for this project include wood board, power drill, tape measure, adhesive, etc. Read the tutorial for details. Follow the steps properly to make a nice and strong wall rack. This rack makes use of magnets to hold metal items. The tutorial explains the procedure for building this beautiful wall rack. Make sure to use only high quality items for any woodworking project. Use the rack only to hang items that are not too heavy for the magnet to hold. Also, be careful while working around this wall rack and beware of the knives falling off the rack.
Just wanted to show gratitude for the inspiration and knowledge you’ve given. As a former science teacher AND compositor/animator, I can really get down with your attention to detail, clear views/instructions, editing skills and work ethic. I’ve been watching your vids here and there since the sawhorses, of which I have my 2 sets. Since then I’ve been taking your lead and built the conduit rack, multi-function TS hold-down jig and a few more. I appreciate being able to mold them into a workable set up for my 12×20 shop. It’s great to see your success and I wish you the best. You’re doing good things, man, so keep it up.

Their plans are delivered in a PDF format as part of a vlog series. They have regular episodes in the form of “seasons” and “episodes”. Your head will spin with the sheer number of “episodes” on the website. At the time of writing, it is at season 9, episode 933. A small caveat, though, is that you have to subscribe to their newsletter to download the free plans. No biggie. It’s just something to keep in mind.
The video explains the step by step process of making a nice wooden phone stand from scratch. My first wooden holder was not the best one, but it was good enough to motivate me to make more. I now possess 10 mobile wooden stands in different shapes and styles. And if I can make this, you too can make one yourself. Search the internet for more mobile holder ideas and start making one now.
Another awesome thing about this coffee table is that it is also has a storage unit. So you can store drinks, and other stuff in the half barrel of your table and then close or open it whenever you need. Pete has also constructed a video for this tutorial for which you can find the link below. It illustrates the same process in a video guide that shows you the exact process to be followed while building this whiskey barrel coffee table.
To my right, I have my sharpening bench, drill press and charging station. The sharpening bench is equipped with a 6" metal vise and houses all my sharpening accessories. On the back of the bench is a fluorescent lamp with a magnify­ing lens that is shared with the drill press. All my drill bits are stored either in the drawer beneath the drill press table or in boxes hung on French cleats. To the right of the drill press, I have a shelf with a power bar that supplies power to my bat­tery chargers. I leave them all plugged in and instead use the power bar’s on/off rocker switch.
Working on one side at a time, glue and nail the side to the back. Apply glue and drive three 1-5/8-in. nails into each shelf, attach the other side and nail those shelves into place to secure them. Clamps are helpful to hold the unit together while you’re driving nails. Center the top piece, leaving a 2-in. overhang on both sides, and glue and nail it into place. Paint or stain the unit and then drill pilot holes into the top face of each side of the unit and screw in the hooks to hold your ironing board. Mount the shelf on drywall using screw-in wall anchors.
I built my first platform bed by following the steps mentioned in the tutorial and the end result was everything I expected. It was as beautiful as comfortable and strong. It only cost me around $60 to build this one from the scratch. And if I can build it, anyone can. What you need is a little bit of woodworking experience and a lot of confidence. Collect the items as suggested in the video and start working now.

Working with reclaimed wood is a savvy use of resources, and the material's country appeal is undeniable. With just a saw and a small drill, you can reuse old fencing to make these simple woodworking projects: picket-inspired picture frames. Finish them off by hot-gluing clothespins or bulldog clips to hang your prints. Here’s a step-by-step guide.
One thing I preach is to make use of the area above your head. In my shop, I’ve installed cabinets on the walls that start a few inches over my head and run up to the ceiling. That way they don’t restrict my movements but still provide a lot of extra storage. I’ve also mounted a power bar to the bottom of the cabinets, which makes it really accessible and it can never be blocked. If your cabinets don’t go all the way up to the ceiling, on top is a great place to store long material. For ease of acces­sibility, smaller items go on the lower shelves while taller items go on the higher shelves.
The beauty of this project lies in the simplicity. All you need are 3 pieces of wood of your choice (though we must admit natural hardwoods will look incredible), sanding block, clamps, wood glue and finishing product. The hardest step of the whole tutorial is measuring – as always, measure 9 times, cut once! You wouldn’t want to finish your project and then realize it doesn’t have enough space to fit your DVD player, would you?
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