Jay, You gave some vital advise- not to go into debt over a tool. Unfortunately I do owe a little for some of my things about $300.00 worth, but I went from $60,000/year income down to $25,000/year when I retired due to bone CA I had as a teen.( I was only suppose to live 3 month and I am now 54, so guess they were wrong about that.) But with age comes arthritis in the arek9a of surgery and was force to give up my job as a mail carrier. The income drop was and is huge for me. I have paid cash for 90% of my tools, but some i have had to charge. I really only need one more tool which is a Thickness planer. I’m holding out for a sale on the Rigid Planer which has all the features I want. Enough about me. I have watched your shop grow from the first video to this video and it has come out beautifully and a model for others to follow, especially your Miter station. Anyone with that amount of space could easily make it with your plans,or just watching the build video’s. You have utilized every inch of that garage perfectly, and I love the idea of having a rolling storage rack for sheet goods that can be moved to you truck to unload and move back into place. You have come along way in a years time. Maybe I should start making bigger item and sell them out front on my lawn, instead of on Etsy. Best of luck always Jay. PS.- I’m wearing your shirt that say’s” Nothing works unless you do”. It’s my motto now.~Dolly
Lumber and supplies are moved in and out of the shop through the front overhead door. To the left of the door are the lumber and plywood storage racks. Across from the lumber rack and to the right of the overhead door is the radial arm saw, miter saw and mortise utilizing a single fence system for all operations. Below and above these are cabinets and storage for misc. power hand tools. Next to the radial arm saw and in the corner is the floor drill press with accessory storage next to it for all drilling operations.  Across from the radial arm saw is a separate workstation set up with a small portable table saw and router set-up with storage underneath for routers, bits and accessories.
French cleats are a simple way to hang things on walls while allowing easy repositioning. One bevelled cleat is fastened to the wall and the other is fastened to whatever you want to hang. One catches the other and gravity does the rest. French cleats are commonly cut at 45 degrees but I prefer to cut mine at around 30 degrees. This makes them easier to lift off the wall (especially way up high) without sacrificing security.

My first woodworking “shop” was in the living room and kitchen of a run-down house trailer (2008-ish). Nothing pretty at all but it was functional. At that time I was living on my own with a job paying just over minimum wage. The engine in my truck blew a head gasket and the only option for me to rebuild the engine without going into debt was to sell off my woodshop. I sold everything but my miter saw. It was a hard lesson learned on being prepared with an emergency fund and I’ll never put myself in that kind of situation again.
Their free woodworking plans are well-illustrated, easy to follow and best of all – free. You can’t beat that! Their plans are directly available on their website for easy viewing and printing. You do not have to download any PDF files. It is an easy point and click, with several dozens of in-depth plans available for free, all for your viewing pleasure.
Aside from the privacy it offers, a latticework porch trellis is a perfect way to add major curb appeal to your home for $100 or less. The trellis shown here is made of cedar, but any decay-resistant wood like redwood, cypress or treated pine would also be a good option. Constructed with lap joints for a flat surface and an oval cutout for elegance, it’s a far upgrade from traditional premade garden lattice. As long as you have experience working a router, this project’s complexity lies mostly in the time it takes to cut and assemble. Get the instructions complete with detailed illustrations here.

Each issue of Wood News , our online woodworking magazine, features a different home workshop, and we've compiled 10 of these features here. Browsing them is a great way to find new ideas on how to set up your own shop, or if you just want to see innovative ways other woodworkers have approached the various shop setup issues we all face. From space considerations and smart storage ideas to the various tool combinations and approaches to woodworking, you'll find something here that's really interesting. Click each image to take a look!

Woodworkers are a social bunch, and there are a few popular forums where people share thoughts on tools, discuss technique at length, and—of course—upload their plans. Some of the most active online woodworking communities include Lumberjocks, Woodworking Talk, Wood Magazine, WoodNet, Kreg, and Sawmill Creek. Search those to see if they have what you’re looking for (either with their built-in search tool or with Google’s site-specific search, e.g. site:lumberjocks.com side table).
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