Mate, I started watching you after seeing a kerf cutting dado jig out of a drywall screw and a few pieces of scrape. You have gone from strength to strength. Each project bigger and better. But not unachievable to the average home woodworker. Keep up the good work. Your Scetchup tutorials are so easy to follow. I have learnt heaps watching you. Now a year after your big move your going strong. Thank you Jay
As with many of you out there I always enjoy checking out a shop tour. I hope you were able to take away at least something from this shop tour. If you would like to see some reader shop tours that have already been featured on this website you can do so here. If you would like your shop to be featured on this website feel free to drop me a line using my contact form. Thanks for stopping by folks and have a great day!
Start with ¾" plywood that is twice as wide as the depth of the cabinet and as long as one side and top/bottom. I crosscut the top and bottom off of one end and set it aside. Then, using a ½" dado stack in my table saw, I cut a series of ¼" deep dadoes across the sides. Make the spacing between them uniform so that the drawers are interchange­able. Finally, rip the sides and top/bottom in half to separate them and assemble the cabinet however you please. If you want to hang it on a wall, attach a French cleat to the back at the top and a batten of equal thickness at the bottom.
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Learning from the ideas of other woodworkers, while avoiding their mistakes is an excellent way to design and set-up your own shop layout. Setting up a woodworking shop as a hobby place, or for a some one more serious, who even may venture off into some sort of woodworking business; is not as easy as it might sound. Knowing the correct steps to follow will save you time and money, but it will also save you a lot of stress down the road.
Likewise, I keep all the tools nearby that are required to make adjustments to my machinery. In the center of my machine shop, I keep metric and imperial wrenches and hex keys, a machinist’s square, a stepped height gauge and a multi-bit screwdriver. I try to store machine-specific accessories such as blades and wrenches within a step of the machine. My table-saw blades are stored on the wall to the left of my table-saw, but I prefer how editor Rob Brown stores his blades.
French cleats are a simple way to hang things on walls while allowing easy repositioning. One bevelled cleat is fastened to the wall and the other is fastened to whatever you want to hang. One catches the other and gravity does the rest. French cleats are commonly cut at 45 degrees but I prefer to cut mine at around 30 degrees. This makes them easier to lift off the wall (especially way up high) without sacrificing security.
There’s a lot of space above the shelf in most closets. Even though it’s a little hard to reach, it’s a great place to store seldom-used items. Make use of this wasted space by adding a second shelf above the existing one. Buy enough closet shelving material to match the length of the existing shelf plus enough for two end supports and middle supports over each bracket. Twelve-inch-wide shelving is available in various lengths and finishes at home centers and lumberyards.
To my right, I have my sharpening bench, drill press and charging station. The sharpening bench is equipped with a 6" metal vise and houses all my sharpening accessories. On the back of the bench is a fluorescent lamp with a magnify­ing lens that is shared with the drill press. All my drill bits are stored either in the drawer beneath the drill press table or in boxes hung on French cleats. To the right of the drill press, I have a shelf with a power bar that supplies power to my bat­tery chargers. I leave them all plugged in and instead use the power bar’s on/off rocker switch.
Great Shop… My wife is hinting at my earliest convenience to start my garage project. We’re changing the one car garage into a half his and half hers… I am a handyman, so i don’t just do one thing. So I am many types of tools…the working space will be 10×13 and have a loft. I have had to take my miter saw with me on occasional jobs, but am thinking about a miter saw station. Any suggestions?
I recently met  a man  known among local woodworkers for having a large workshop with a lot of tools. He offered to show me his workshop, and  take photographs of it. His workshop covers the entire basement of a large 1800 square foot bungalow. It's difficult to capture this workshop in just a few photos, so I figured I'd include a large number of photos.
Building a Wooden Office Desk Organizer is an easy task for a professional woodworker, but not so much for normal people like you and me. But that doesn’t mean you cannot do this. Two years ago, I had almost no woodworking experience, but now I make most of my household and office wooden items by myself. This saves me a lot of money. And believe me when I say this; you can also manage to make wonderful wood items with a little practice and some woodworking experience.
This rack can be built from old unused wood pallets you can find around the house. So it is also a great way to recycle those old pallets. You can also find a step by step tutorial at instructables.com for which I have included the source link below. This tutorial helps you to make a wood wine rack from the scratch. So what are waiting for? Just grab the items you need and start building a cool wooden rack for those nice wine bottles of yours.
I recently came across this beautiful wooden swing set, which was made in the shape of a boat. Cool, isn’t it? The very first look was enough for me to start loving it. Although I haven’t yet tried building one myself, I am definitely going to. Later I realized that you can also build a baby cradle with the same idea. After all, what can be more calming than the tender rocking of a boat? This swing set will surely help your child get more gentle sleep.
The table saw is always connected to my dust collector with a couple pieces of 4” flex hose and some 4” sewer and drain PVC pipe and a homemade blast gate. The port on the table saw is at the rear of the cabinet and this particular area of the shop sees the least amount of foot traffic so I have no problem just leaving the ducting on the floor. I also always have a few other cords on the floor here. I see this as the same principle as walking onto a porch. You know the steps are there so you pick up your feet. I know the pipe is there so I pick up my feet. Not a trip hazard in my opinion.

Right in front of my finishing supply rack is my welder and welder cabinet. It’s a Hobart Handler 140 mig or flux core wire feed welder. I learned how to weld several years ago on an old manual adjustment arc welder and I very much like the convenience of the wire feed in this one. It’s sitting on a Harbor Freight welding cabinet. I have only used it in one video so far (metal vise build) but have used it a few times since then on stuff around the house. Having a welder isn’t a necessity but it is very convenient at times.

To the left of the cart on the wall is my universal clamp rack and finishing supply rack. They are both mounted to the wall with a french cleat. The clamp rack is a universal design I recently made to hold every one of my clamps without having to make specific profile holders for each style clamp. Having them all in one location is very convenient. My finishing supply rack was made in my previous shop and has served me well. I’ve currently outgrown it slightly but I really like the efficiency of storage for finishing supplies. It has a few short shelves for quart size cans and a few shelves for standard spray size cans. I might make a larger version of this in the future.
I really enjoyed this video. I don’t particularly enjoy watching videos every time someone changes the layout of their shop. But, yours is the exception. I know a lot of your fans have probably been asking for a while for you to do a tour of your shop. Glad you waited till it was all finished to do it. You must’ve shot this video before you got your festool tools.

It might not be the easiest project in this list, but if you already have some experience with wood cutting and joinery, it won’t be any hassle at all. Thanks to the extremely detailed instructions it shouldn’t really be a problem even if you’re not very familiar with woodworking. This could actually be a great project for refining your woodworking skills as a beginner!

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